“Honker of a pothole” in Forest of Nisene Marks, reader says

Dear Street Smarts, Q: I'm writing this with one hand, as I broke my wrist recently falling off my bike. The cause? A honker of a pothole on the road into Nisene Marks from Aptos Village. It's in the worst possible place and I understand I'm not the only who's tangled with it. Now, I'm out for revenge! I want it filled in. Any chance of that happening? Thanks, Ann Schwartz, via email A: Done. Maintenance crews went out last Monday to fill potholes, including this one, said Kirk Lingenfelter, Pajaro Coast Sector Superintendent. "This was routine maintenance and they did not know of the complaint," he said. Thank you for sending a Google map link to pinpoint the pothole's location and which jurisdiction it fell in.
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11 Responses to “Honker of a pothole” in Forest of Nisene Marks, reader says

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sorry to hear about the broken wrist,u00a0

  2. Anonymous says:

    but happy to hear the potholes leading to Nisene have been filled. They were pretty gnarly.

  3. Rnorse3 says:

    Don:  The folks who came to City
    Council last night have lots of legitimate concerns about City
    Council’s continuous failures.  Some of these failures include
    (a) not directing police resources to real crime rather than visible
    poverty downtown and elsewhere; (b) lack of trash pick-ups and
    disposal services (for those outside); (c) the absurd defunding of
    needle exchange and other services dealing with harm reduction around
    needle use; (d) the ridiculous priorities of the City Council in
    terms of multi-million dollar giveaways (or lend-aways) for sports
    stadiums, desal projects, etc.; (e) the medieval lack of public
    24-hour bathrooms in Santa Cruz.   And of course,
    the usual siphoning off of public outrage into do-nothing
    sub-committees that disperse the activism and attempt to damp down
    the concerns without really addressing them. There a few
    things missing from your analysis (and that of most of the folks
    doing the clean-up and the heads-up at City Council).First,
    Drug Prohibition makes drug sales immensely profitable (recall
    alcohol prohibition).  Bust one drug dealer and another will
    take her place.   It’s a way for poor people to survive in
    a wretched economy.  So it always is with black market stuff. 
    Legalize, regulate, and medicalize the situation–as is being tried
    in Vancouver and Europe.  Second, homelessness
    encourages some  folks to self-medicate given the grim
    conditions that obtain (sleeping bans, sitting bans, NIMBY hostility,
    bureaucratic indifference, the utterly inadequate social services,
    etc.)  Just a fact.Third lack of alternatives for those
    who want to break drug addictions makes the attacks on drug users and
    abusers simply punitive rather than rehabilitative.  Fourth,
    lack of campgrounds and sleeping facilities for homeless folks (there
    is shelter for less than 5% of the homeless) combined with laws that
    make all sleeping and camping illegal encourage a general disrespect
    for the law, a lack of solidarity in fighting real crime (assaults,
    thefts, etc.).  I would encourage folks to struggle to
    protect themselves against theft and not rely on the police. 
    That doesn’t mean assuming that every homeless person you see in the
    bushes is a threat, or raising a hue and cry to starve out or drive
    out every “sketchy” person.Increasing police and
    vigilante  harassment and violence against the homeless
    community is the wrong way to go.   

    A lot of this serves to distract us from those who are engaging in theft
    on a more grander scale as banks foreclose on homes, jobs are
    strategically located oversees for cheaper wages, and both political
    parties play deaf, dumb, and blind as foreign wars devour tax dollars. 
    Not to mention inaccessible local officials ignoring the community’s needs both of the poor
    and working people to decent services and real health and safetyI would say
    this to those indoors who are ready and willing to address problems that City Councilmembers and City Staff are not:  meet with homeless people and talk with
    them.  Invite them to community meetings to learn their needs
    and experiences.   Work with them to address real crime and to end the criminalization of the innocent. 

    Homeless people are four times as vulnerable as you are
    to violence and stamped with a label of “criminal” to begin
    with every time they sit down near a building, sleep under a bridge,
    or ask for a dime after dark.

     

  4. Rnorse3 says:

    (Reposted to deal with run-on paragraphs and bad formatting apparently created by the disqus format.  Please eliminate the early duplicated post.)

    Don:  The folks who came to City
    Council last night have lots of legitimate concerns about City
    Council’s continuous failures.  Some of these failures include
    (a) not directing police resources to real crime rather than visible
    poverty downtown and elsewhere; (b) lack of trash pick-ups and
    disposal services (for those outside); (c) the absurd defunding of
    needle exchange and other services dealing with harm reduction around
    needle use; (d) the ridiculous priorities of the City Council in
    terms of multi-million dollar giveaways (or lend-aways) for sports
    stadiums, desal projects, etc.; (e) the medieval lack of public
    24-hour bathrooms in Santa Cruz.  

    And of course,
    the usual siphoning off of public outrage into do-nothing
    sub-committees that disperse the activism and attempt to damp down
    the concerns without really addressing them.

    There a few
    things missing from your analysis (and that of most of the folks
    doing the clean-up and the heads-up at City Council).

    First,
    Drug Prohibition makes drug sales immensely profitable (recall
    alcohol prohibition).  Bust one drug dealer and another will
    take her place.   It’s a way for poor people to survive in
    a wretched economy.  So it always is with black market stuff. 
    Legalize, regulate, and medicalize the situation–as is being tried
    in Vancouver and Europe. 

    Second, homelessness
    encourages some  folks to self-medicate given the grim
    conditions that obtain (sleeping bans, sitting bans, NIMBY hostility,
    bureaucratic indifference, the utterly inadequate social services,
    etc.)  Just a fact.

    Third lack of alternatives for those
    who want to break drug addictions makes the attacks on drug users and
    abusers simply punitive rather than rehabilitative. 

    Fourth,
    lack of campgrounds and sleeping facilities for homeless folks (there
    is shelter for less than 5% of the homeless) combined with laws that
    make all sleeping and camping illegal encourage a general disrespect
    for the law, a lack of solidarity in fighting real crime (assaults,
    thefts, etc.). 

    I would encourage folks to struggle to
    protect themselves against theft and not rely on the police. 
    That doesn’t mean assuming that every homeless person you see in the
    bushes is a threat, or raising a hue and cry to starve out or drive
    out every “sketchy” person.

    Increasing police and
    vigilante  harassment and violence against the homeless
    community is the wrong way to go.   

    A lot of this serves to distract us from those who are engaging in theft
    on a more grander scale as banks foreclose on homes, jobs are
    strategically located oversees for cheaper wages, and both political
    parties play deaf, dumb, and blind as foreign wars devour tax dollars. 
    Not to mention inaccessible local officials ignoring the community’s needs both of the poor
    and working people to decent services and real health and safety

    I
    would say
    this to those indoors who are ready and willing to address problems that
    City Councilmembers and City Staff are not:  meet with homeless people
    and talk with
    them.  Invite them to community meetings to learn their needs
    and experiences.   Work with them to address real crime and to end the
    criminalization of the innocent. 

    Homeless people are four times as vulnerable as you are
    to violence and stamped with a label of “criminal” to begin
    with every time they sit down near a building, sleep under a bridge,
    or ask for a dime after dark.

  5. Cbrown1389 says:

    same ole protests just different protestors???? how shallow……I will always remember Shannon Collins chopped to death in broad daylight!!!!! I will fight to keep dirty needles out of OUR children’s playgrounds!!! I will fight to keep creeps from crapping right in our rivers and streams (we have video if you care ). What have you done to make this county safe besides blow hot air? Seeing kids playing in the river mouth where up streak careless criminals pollute the water. Bottom line is we make it easy for addicts to afford their drugs here, we have created a market for the dealers, we need to STOP it!!! proof of residence for aid or leave! We can not handle all the people from all over this country, just interview some of these transients and see where they come from, we need to keep our resources for our own residences who fall on hard times, not support drug addicts.

  6. Cbrown1389 says:

     my brother has worked skid row San Francisco for over 30 years and most “homeless” want it that way, do not want rules, do not want shelter, only want to do drugs and drink. These guys just killed one of their own with a rock and another stabbed a sweet woman in broad daylight, so your poor homeless is nothing but crap! Like the dude that took a dump in the creek!!! No care for the ocean that creek runs into or the kids that play at the mouth of it. Cut your bull, it is so old. And with video now, more and more people are witnesses your true intentions and that is nothing but to hear yourself talk! This IS our water, this is our ocean, this is our parks too!!!!! We will not stop until we end this pollution!!!! I came to this town in 76, no job, slept on lighthouse field, got a job, made a life. But so many told me how to use the system like a selfish pig, I refused!!!!! it is attitudes like yours that sent my hero Jerry Garcia to an early grave……all the takers that don’t give back……missed the bus…hell, fell off the bus!

  7. Tjmagallanes says:

    Thank you Robert Norse. As the organizer of the put unity back in community walk, I would like to express that we protested nothing. We carried no signs. And we are not fighting for anything. We are raising community awareness of the issues that you have pointed out and we are WORKING, NOT Fighting for change. I find it very unprofessional of the media not to talk to the organizer of the walk.

  8. Rnorse says:

     Thanks, T.J. 

    Folks interested in discussing this issue can
    call in to Free Radio Santa Cruz tomorrow night (Thursday November
    29th)  6-8 PM at 427-3772 or 469-3119.   The show broadcasts at 101.3 FM
    and streams at  http://tunein.com/radio/FRSC-s47254/ .  It will archive afterwards at  http://www.radiolibre.org/brb/brb121129.mp3.

    You can also e-mail in your comments to rnorse3@hotmail.com

  9. SConner says:

    Did you read the article you cited, Mr. Miller? I did and I didn’t see the word “protest” anywhere.
    Calling this walk a protest is lazy and inaccurate. Instead of imagining why people decided to walk along the tracks to the City Council meeting, maybe you should go speak to some of the people involved.
    Or, better yet, get out from behind your and walk around down there for yourself. There would be very little left to the imagination.

  10. Brent says:

    The San Lorenzo River is polluted because of massive septic system breaches by the hundreds all the way up to and past Boulder Creek.  We’ve known this for decades.  If folks are unhappy with poo-poo then we need ample places for folks to do their do.  Where ARE people who live outside for whatever reason to go?  Public restrooms, which are very few are only open during daylight hours.  Its easy to attack homeless from this distance and make them wrong for everything but what is really required is a little more compassion and community engagement.

  11. Frank Martin says:

    A lot of this serves to distract us from those who are engaging in theft
    on a more grander scale as banks foreclose on homes, jobs are
    strategically located oversees for cheaper wages, and both political
    parties play deaf, dumb, and blind as foreign wars devour tax dollars. 
    Not to mention inaccessible local officials ignoring the community’s needs both of the poor
    and working people to decent services and real health and safety

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