Postseason changes to CCS Open Division

Before I get into the new changes to the CCS Open Division format, we had a story in today’s Sentinel about the League Classification Index and the SCCAL’s “C” league status.

Right now, the SCCAL is a “C” league, although that could all change when the new League Classification Index numbers are released, or if the football committee votes to change the SCCAL’s classification with a two-thirds vote.

Big ifs, though. Nothing is guaranteed. Although the SCCAL, on paper, does not pass the “C” league eye test, it didn’t help itself with first-round playoff ousters of Aptos and Scotts Valley this season.

The delay of the LCI numbers might be the bigger story, though, which makes scheduling a problem. And Soquel might be in the most difficult position.

The Knights return a bunch from last year’s already solid team, and are right now the favorites of winning the SCCAL title next season. So, who would want to play them?

What nonleague team wants to play a “C” league opponent that they could very well lose to? For the opposition, it doesn’t make much sense.

This story will become much more interesting when the LCI numbers are released. We’ll keep you updated.

As for the CCS Open Division changes, there was one significant tweak from the December recommendations. With no more “opting up,” those qualifying to the Open Division will include the champions of the five “A” leagues.

The remaining three spots will then go to the top three teams in regard to power points.

The one significant tweak? Whichever of the “A” leagues is considered to be the strongest based on the LCI numbers will be referred to as the “A+” league, and it will receive 1.5 points for its league games, instead of the 1.0 point teams receive in the other “A” leagues.

In theory, the “A+” league would get four berths to the Open Division playoffs, including the league champ and the next three teams in the standings considering they would LIKELY have the most power points. It will be interesting to see how this all shakes out, though.

During the December recommendations, the initial plan on the table would have qualified the top four finishers in the West Catholic Athletic League to the Open Division playoffs. The new tweak, instead of proclaiming the WCAL as the hands-down best league in the CCS year in and year out, keeps the option open for another league to be labeled “the best” any given season.

Interestingly enough, while the WCAL is often considered the best league, last season that honor belonged to the De Anza Division, based on the LCI numbers.

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5 Responses to Postseason changes to CCS Open Division

  1. Mandomorlos says:

    Thank you for the blog on this…..there is one question us readers really want to know, and it is important in this issue. What is the S.C.C.A.L.’s record in CCS playoffs for the last 5 years? It seems as if most of our teams are consistently out by the first round.

    • Andrew Matheson says:

      That’s a great question. Since 2007, teams from the SCCAL have gone 5-11 in the CCS playoffs, but are 0-7 in the last three years. Helping the cause is Santa Cruz’s title-winning postseason in 2007, when it went 3-0. Otherwise, it’s been a struggle for the local teams in the playoffs.

    • Andrew Matheson says:

      That’s a great question. Since 2007, teams from the SCCAL have gone 5-11 in the CCS playoffs, but are 0-7 in the last three years, according to our records. Helping the cause is Santa Cruz’s title-winning postseason in 2007, when it went 3-0. Otherwise, it’s been a bit of a struggle for the local teams in the playoffs.

  2. Mandomorlos says:

    Thank you for the blog on this…..there is one question us readers really want to know, and it is important in this issue. What is the S.C.C.A.L.’s record in CCS playoffs for the last 5 years? It seems as if most of our teams are consistently out by the first round.

    • Andrew Matheson says:

      That’s a great question. Since 2007, teams from the SCCAL have gone 5-11 in the CCS playoffs, but are 0-7 in the last three years, according to our records. Helping the cause is Santa Cruz’s title-winning postseason in 2007, when it went 3-0. Otherwise, it’s been a bit of a struggle for the local teams in the playoffs.

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