Death of police officers: Getting honest about Santa Cruz’s story

Stunned mourners console each other at the vigil for two slain police officers. (Dan Coyro/Sentinel)

As the shock of Tuesday’s tragic violence settles into grief, many people are writing to the Sentinel, or posting online, messages that go something like this::

Our town has been overrun by criminals, because we’ve tolerated aberrant behaviors. This so-called tolerance has not only cost two police officers their lives, but is ruining our beautiful coastal paradise.

Oh, that it was that simple.

To start with, the awful chain of events that led to the deaths of Sgt. Loran Baker and Det. Elizabeth Butler lead back into what our reporters are finding in the disturbed and disturbing life of Jeremy Goulet, the man who killed the two detectives and who died himself in a hail of bullets shortly after.

Unlike many such individuals who commit heinous crimes, Goulet’s trail is not all that difficult to follow, but, almost inevitably, there is a sense of missed chances that would have diverted him from this fateful encounter with the two Santa Cruz police officers. Goulet’s odyssey through the criminal justice system in Portland, Ore. — ironically, another city know, and often mocked, for its “tolerance” — leaves a number of “what if” questions. Why would Oregon not have a statute that would have identified him as a sex offender? Was any attempt made to separate him from his guns? Why would he have been jailed for his threatening behavior toward law enforcement officials in that city, but then be released with seemingly little follow-up? Why did he not end up in prison?

His arrest only last Friday in Santa Cruz — he bailed out of jail — may or may not have triggered alarms that a guy with a violent past involving guns and sex offenses was on the prowl here and may have led to Tuesday’s encounter with the two detectives.

While we’ll continue to dig into Goulet’s past and his run-ins with the law, what we’ve found already is unsettling — Goulet came here not that long ago, he was again apparently acting out his deviant sexual behaviors toward women, he was angry and resentful, and he owned guns. His own father told reporters today his son was a “ticking time bomb.”

It’s certainly true that in the wrong circumstances in any town, anywhere, a deranged person bent on violence will be able to carry out his wicked revenge fantasies. And while it’s also true none of what went on before made these awful events somehow inevitable, it’s hardly a stretch to look in the rear-view mirror and see the potential for something really bad happening involving Jeremy Goulet was coming this way.

So back to the thought that Santa Cruz is a mecca of sorts for criminals and disturbed individuals.

Certainly, events of the past year or so seem to indicate just that. The horrifying murder on a public street in broad daylight of local shop owner Shannon Collins by a deranged homeless ex-con last May seemed to open a new chapter of violence and fear in Santa Cruz, the city and the county. Subsequently, more violence, including a recent downtown killling, home invasions, gang retaliations, shootings, rapes, homeless encampments and assorted other crimes and situations have set the community on an even more precarious edge. Add to that recent Sentinel coverage of a mostly unregulated needle exchange program that dovetailed with increasing community outrage over an epidemic of heroin and methamphetamine use and dealing, and there began to be a noticeable shift of public perceptions. Our well-known and sometimes relished weirdness and tolerance had turned on itself.

But the truth is that this present darkness is not something altogether new.

In the early 1970s, and proceeding grimly into the ’80s, Santa Cruz, city and county, was the scene of a series of grisly and demented mass murders; some were tied to the drug counterculture, some to what has become almost commonplace in today’s news: a breakdown in the mental health system that even then allowed dangerously ill violent predators to wreak evil on a law-abiding, but often naive, local population.

The names of some of the killers still resound in a macabre and hideous hall of shame: Edmund Kemper, Herbert Mullin, John Linley Frazier, David Carpenter (aka “The Trailside Killer”). And that’s just the most infamous ones. There were others. Santa Cruz had to live down, or outlive, a sordid reputation as the “murder capital” if not of the world, certainly of California.

My point, though, isn’t that Santa Cruz, so beautiful and so blessed in terms of geography and people, has some sort of evil curse hovering about, or that the excesses of the ’60s somehow landed here and settled in to inflict more and more misery and suffering.

But clearly, several threads run through our story that continue to weave into this latest tragedy.

One is the drug culture that took root here long ago and continues today. The Sentinel has reported ad infinitum on the epidemics of hard drugs in this community and the cost in terms of ruined lives and associated crimes. But — and here’s where the increasingly reviled “tolerance” label sticks in the craw — people are still drawn here by the availability of drugs such as heroin and meth along with the prevalent street and underground culture that has caused a strong counter reaction among citizens and neighborhood groups.

Another is that while police have been supported — and the outpouring of tributes and grief toward the two slain officers is proof — this support has historically been tempered with a wariness about too heavy a presence, which might scare away tourists, or students, or people buying expensive homes. While law enforcement in this county is committed, well-trained, even well-paid, no one who lives in Santa Cruz County would ever say there are “too many cops” or their presence is too pervasive. That’s just the way it’s been for a long time

.Santa Cruz also suffers because the county jail is just off downtown and the homeless shelters are near downtown. Since the area also attracts what seems to be a higher-than-almost-anywhere-else number of backpack-toting transients — some drawn here by the drug culture, others by the high level of services — along with people with serious mental issues, the mix has created a long-standing tension downtown and in other parts of the city.

With the violent gang subculture also mixed in, along with the prevalence of guns, the results can be volatile.

The deaths of officers Baker and Butler — senseless and horrifying as they were — will not be in vain if all of us who live in Santa Cruz County are willing to have an honest and open discussion about what is acceptable — and what is not. There’s a cost in terms of saying we don’t want to be a haven for drug dealers, street criminals and people who think by coming here they can act out some sort of demented fantasy that would not be tolerated anywhere else.

Butch Baker and Elizabeth Butler can no longer speak into the Santa Cruz story. We who remain can bring meaning to their sacrifice and honor their memories if we confront even the painful chapters and begin a new narrative.

This entry was posted in Crime, culture, History, In the spirit, Journalism, Local news, Opinion, state news. Bookmark the permalink.

94 Responses to Death of police officers: Getting honest about Santa Cruz’s story

  1. Joseph Shaughnessy says:

    u201cBecause 99% of the time they’re dealing with people who ARE NO THREAT TO ANYONE, but have been ‘criminalized’ by city policy. So they start believing there are no dangerous people around, because truly, they ARE RARE around here.u201dnnnnnTalk about boilerplate.nnnnnThe same socialist utopians you have elected for decades have passed these laws. Take them to the woodshed, not me. In case you missed it, some of your cute little street urchins tried to hold me down and knife me. I was lucky I was also young and in the best shape of my life, or I might not be writing this today. I promise you, guys like that coming in on Peerless Stages from Oakland and Berkeley were in no way the middleclass you speak of. But it does beg the question:nnnnnIn an environment where violence, i.e. the annual May Day Kristallnach, is so regularly pooh-poohed by the powers that be in Santa Cruz, how do you not see you must be prepared for the likes of Goulet to arrive, go in rut, and unleash mayhem?nnnnnI know you must hate the middleclassu2026..but why so Occupy? If you want to hate the middleclass, maybe we should examine all of those who have access to suchnresources, like those sleeping in the 32 bed River Street facility that cost $225,000/bed to build over twenty years ago (never mind running cost), with incredible expensee in proportion to such a small city and county (I believe it was 14 beds initially). No, I do not hate anyone who needs such services for a time, but consider how many careerists are on the board running that and other SC County homeless projects, how many u201chomelessu201d cycle through Santa Cruz because it is a known mark regarding benefits to u201chomelessu201d and tell me this does not make Santa Cruz an institutionalnmagnet for “homeless” for our region, state, and nation.u00a0

  2. Joseph Shaughnessy says:

    u201cBecause 99% of the time they’re dealing with people who ARE NO THREAT TO ANYONE, but have been ‘criminalized’ by city policy. So they start believing there are no dangerous people around, because truly, they ARE RARE around here.u201dnnnnnTalk about boilerplate.nnnnnThe same socialist utopians you have elected for decades have passed these laws. Take them to the woodshed, not me. In case you missed it, some of your cute little street urchins tried to hold me down and knife me. I was lucky I was also young and in the best shape of my life, or I might not be writing this today. I promise you, guys like that coming in on Peerless Stages from Oakland and Berkeley were in no way the middleclass you speak of. But it does beg the question:nnnnnIn an environment where violence, i.e. the annual May Day Kristallnach, is so regularly pooh-poohed by the powers that be in Santa Cruz, how do you not see you must be prepared for the likes of Goulet to arrive, go in rut, and unleash mayhem?nnnnnI know you must hate the middleclassu2026..but why so Occupy? If you want to hate the middleclass, maybe we should examine all of those who have access to suchnresources, like those sleeping in the 32 bed River Street facility that cost $225,000/bed to build over twenty years ago (never mind running cost), with incredible expensee in proportion to such a small city and county (I believe it was 14 beds initially). No, I do not hate anyone who needs such services for a time, but consider how many careerists are on the board running that and other SC County homeless projects, how many u201chomelessu201d cycle through Santa Cruz because it is a known mark regarding benefits to u201chomelessu201d and tell me this does not make Santa Cruz an institutionalnmagnet for “homeless” for our region, state, and nation.u00a0

  3. RazerRay says:

    “I know youu00a0must hate the middleclass.” nnNo, I don’t “Hate” anyone. AAMOF Iu00a0raisedu00a0two children around here and kept two junker cars u00a0runningu00a0while working a number of local jobs… SOME were good paying highu00a0profileu00a0skilled jobs too.nnIt’s the pandering to the transient u00a0middle class at the expense of au00a0vilifiedu00a0and now displaced LOCAL working class (now called ‘the homeless… 70% of them anyway) that I DESPISE THE CITY FOR. Got that?nnThe words are DESPISED, and CITY, NOT “Hate” and Middle class”nnJust the fact you think the non-factualu00a0myth thatu00a0Santau00a0Cruz provides great “benefits” for theu00a0homelessu00a0 when in reality a town HALF THIS SIZE, Arcata, has TWO shelters… That actually shelter people, indicates you’reu00a0ignoranceu00a0 or the mindlessu00a0parrotingu00a0of Take Back Santa Cruz agitprop.Other than that thanks for the laugh. I think we all need it when the editor of a city newspaper troll-baits and conflates in an editorial using the murder of two well-respected police officers by u00a0a HOUSED MIDDLE CLASS EMPLOYED PERSON with the utterlyu00a0non-related Homeless and Drug issue.

  4. RazerRay says:

    “I know youu00a0must hate the middleclass.” nnNo, I don’t “Hate” anyone. AAMOF Iu00a0raisedu00a0two children around here and kept two junker cars u00a0runningu00a0while working a number of local jobs… SOME were good paying highu00a0profileu00a0skilled jobs too.nnIt’s the pandering to the transient u00a0middle class at the expense of au00a0vilifiedu00a0and now displaced LOCAL working class (now called ‘the homeless… 70% of them anyway) that I DESPISE THE CITY FOR. Got that?nnThe words are DESPISED, and CITY, NOT “Hate” and Middle class”nnJust the fact you think the non-factualu00a0myth thatu00a0Santau00a0Cruz provides great “benefits” for theu00a0homelessu00a0 when in reality a town HALF THIS SIZE, Arcata, has TWO shelters… That actually shelter people, indicates you’reu00a0ignoranceu00a0 or the mindlessu00a0parrotingu00a0of Take Back Santa Cruz agitprop.Other than that thanks for the laugh. I think we all need it when the editor of a city newspaper troll-baits and conflates in an editorial using the murder of two well-respected police officers by u00a0a HOUSED MIDDLE CLASS EMPLOYED PERSON with the utterlyu00a0non-related Homeless and Drug issue.

  5. Marc Reeve says:

    One comment:nYou ask “Why would Oregon not have a statute that would have identified him as a sex offender?” nHad he been arrested for the same offense in California, he would not have had to register as a sex offender either. In both states, being a “Peeping Tom” falls under disorderly conduct statutes and is a misdemeanor, not a felony, and does not require registration. Nor is the charge of carrying a weapon without a permit a felony in Oregon – it’s a misdemeanor. It seems, looking at Goulet’s criminal history, that he always managed to skate on the more serious charges (like the “attempted murder” in the Oregon incident). I just saw a tweet from one of your reporters that he was accused of rape in Hawaii seven years ago, but was found not guilty. (Though I note from other stories that that is around when he stopped being in the Army – perhaps there’s a connection there?)n(although, if he’d gotten a Dishonorable Discharge from the military, that is considered the equivalent of a felony conviction as far as firearms ownership goes.)

  6. RazerRay says:

    Again, what does any of this have to do with a HOUSED MIDDLE CLASS EMPLOYED PERSON killing two police officers?

  7. Marc Reeve says:

    u00a0Sadly, none of the crimes of which he was convicted required him to register as a sex offender even though, clearly, he was. nIt has recently been posted that in 2006 he was accused of rape in Hawaii but was found not guilty. That would have required sex offender registration and also restricted his gun ownership.

  8. Marc Reeve says:

    u00a0a) the “campus rape” is now revealed to have been a hoax, and in any case it was not the primary responsibility of SCPD. nb) the shooting at Natural Bridges and Pauly Silva’s murder happened a mere two weeks ago. Contrary to television, solving violent crimes tends to take longer than 50 minutes plus commercials unless a suspect is caught “red handed”. I was under the impression that arrests had been made in the Silva case, anyway.nc) don’t violate downtown ordinances with police officers around. Obvious.

  9. Marc Reeve says:

    u00a0argh, double post. How come I can’t delete the extra, Disqus?

  10. RazerRay says:

    Maybeu00a0from the disqus conrol panel… Or perhaps edit it and blank all the text or add an adendum in it’s space might be the ticket

  11. Marc Reeve says:

    u00a0″known sex offender” – false. Jeremy Goulet was on no sexual offender registry.n”also known to own guns” – yeah, that’s valid, but not everyone who owns guns is going to shoot police officers when they show up at the door. Or would you rather there be a policy that a SWAT team show up at the door of people who are known to own guns? (BTW – there are lots of people who legally own guns that don’t have to be registered, so this would also not be effective.)

  12. Joseph Shaughnessy says:

    I have no idea of u00a0who “Take Back Santa Cruz” is and what they profess, as I have lived 35 miles from downtown Santa Cruz since 1993. I am unaware of any efforts by them, so could not possibly “parrot” anything they might say. But regards for your perfected OWS banter,u00a0nnAgain, I’m sorry you do not recognize”the Broken Window Theory” and how toleration and reinforcement of one type of behavior might lead to more detrimental behavior that is criminal.u00a0

  13. Marc Reeve says:

    u00a0You’re repeating ignorant twaddle. He was not a “known sex offender” – he was never convicted of any crime that would put him on the sex offender registry. Also, lots of people own guns (yes, even in oh-so-liberal Santa Cruz) and don’t shoot police officers – why would you want the police to assume they have a chance of being shot if they go to the home of a gun owner? That leads to accidental shootings…

  14. RazerRay says:

    Another moderated comment, a long comment for marc, due to one word bad word, or perhaps the phrase “take back Santa Cruz” where Iu00a0addressedu00a0their spawn as…

  15. RazerRay says:

    I don’t know what OWS is… Sorry.nnnBut if you only live a half hour drive from Santa Cruz yet don’t know what Take Back Santa Cruz is, then why are you even bothering to troll with your nonsense as you are obviously totally out of touch with the problems of Santa Cruz in this century.

  16. SC says:

    RazerRay, you are a moron. Santa Cruz would be a much better place if people like you and the rest of the chemically imballanced freaks bought a one way bus ticket down to Mexico.

  17. RazerRay says:

    Sorryu00a0if the words have too many syllables u00a0or it’s simply too profound for your pea brain to fathom but IS this what set your troll soul twitchin’?nnn”I believe the SCPD’s pandering to commercial property interests, which pretty much revolve around mass enforcing Municipal nuisance ordinances (Harrassification) u00a0designed (but failing) to increase profit margins for the shop owners to allow the property owners higher price/ft for leases, instead of concentrating on community policing which treats ALL RESIDENTS as members of a u00a0community u00a0has led to SCPD’s lack of prioritization of real problems in Santa Cruz,”

  18. James Burtnett says:

    Yea and now they all have dogs that they can’t take care of that also keeps them from looking for a job. POOR Dogs!

  19. James Burtnett says:

    WOWu00a0Blamingu00a0HIPPIES you must be Tripping!u00a0

  20. GJ Thrive says:

    the dogs serve a dual purpose as I understand it: for low-functioning folks a relationship with a dog is often easier to tolerate than with a human (i can relate at times!) ; the police are more hesitant to pick someone up with a dog because they have to do something with the animal.

  21. GJ Thrive says:

    i’m afraid the twisted reality of california real estate has meant that most middle class people have held onto their home for decades and their kids have to rent or move elsewhere.nBut you can blame it on the hippies if you want.

  22. James Burtnett says:

    What I am saying is that a homeless person with a dog can not look for a job or anything else. Plus u00a0the animals are rarely taken can ofu00a0properly. You want a Job or a Dog?u00a0

  23. GJ Thrive says:

    I think it’s important to remember the picture painted by the little we know of the guy. It basically looks like:u00a0″…a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood.”u00a0ie psychopathy.nnInterestingly this man who had an incredible disdain for authority and police joined the military and became a police man. What a clever way to outwit the class you loathe. In some ways his lifelong vendetta against police may have been leading to this moment.If we are to blame anyone it appears that it should be the military disciplinary system which rather than charging him with a crime preferred to discharge him. He was violating policy within weeks of his arrival at some places.nPerhaps because we live in a predominantly white, slightly left of center seaside town, with next to no possibility for growth and an intimate relationship with nature it’s easy for us to maintain an illusion that “we’re all alike” and that only those crazy-eyed homeless people we see walking along the river are the dangerous ones. Our town feels compact no doubt because we have a thriving city center where we congregate. Many of us walk or ride bikes, and we are often outdoors because of the weather – hence we get to see each other and in a way confirm the impression that we’re all alike, that crazy is “not here”.

  24. What's Best for Santa Cruz says:

    “Sorryu00a0if the words have too many syllables u00a0or it’s simply too profound for your pea brain to fathom…”nnReally, RazerRay?!?!u00a0 You’re a clown. nn”No, I don’t “Hate” anyone. AAMOF Iu00a0raisedu00a0two children around here and nkept two junker cars u00a0runningu00a0while working a number of local jobs… nSOME were good paying highu00a0profileu00a0skilled jobs too.” nnYou obviously think you’re intellectually superior to others posting here yet it’s clear you haven’t been able to excel professionally. I would be curious to hear more about the “high profile skilled jobs” you’ve held, why you weren’t able to remain employed and what you’ve done to contribute to this community. nnI agree with SC…you should pack up those two “junker cars” and move elsewhere.

  25. RazerRay says:

    I’mu00a0intellectuallyu00a0superior to you. For a start I can stay on-topic.nnFurther, there’s content along with my ad homs andu00a0denigrations u00a0whether you’d care to agree with those suppositions, facts et al.nnWhat you just posted contained no information that even YOU could consider pertinent to either the subject of “Deadu00a0Policeu00a0Officers… Why?” or a rant about how the homeless areu00a0responsibleu00a0for a housed middle class employed person’s behavior… Or for that matter even a drug-related theme.For what it’s worth the only drugs you’re liable to find among theu00a0decedent killer’su00a0effects are scripts from the VA for stuff that apparently didn’t work too well.

  26. Mitchell says:

    So what exactly is your point?n

  27. erked says:

    u00a0 I agree with most everything written here. What I see as being a part of theu00a0problem is we haveu00a0u00a0city officials (Police, Supervisors, Judges and so on) who seem tou00a0be recalcitrant in makingu00a0tough decisions concerning what really needs to be done to deal with these problems that will continue to plague our county.u00a0nu00a0 Downtown is not just annoying anymore due to the panhandler but now it is an unsafe atmosphere.u00a0 So many people are so quick to judge the ones that have little compassion for the homeless but what about compassion for the business owners and tax payers.nu00a0I am not alone in being sick to death of seeing homeless people walking around like zombies everywhere and knowing that I put out so much effort everyday for my pay and so much of it goesu00a0to the homeless and criminals element and the huge costs involved. nu00a0u00a0It also saddens me to watchu00a0criminals arrestedu00a0over andu00a0over and let go onu00a0with loweru00a0bail, whenu00a0many should be given the sentence they deserve…out of county jailu00a0and off tou00a0the state. Makes me think thatu00a0the bail system brings in enoughu00a0money for the county. u00a0I may be wrong but from a citizens view when violent criminals are not given proper sentencing this is what comes to mind. And I am not alone in that perception.u00a0nu00a0 The really question is, where is the money that we are obviously already spending on the criminals and homeless, best used.u00a0 Tough, smart decision are what is needed ifu00a0we want to keep the Santa Cruz area fromu00a0not just our reputation ofu00a0’weird’, but alsou00a0not family or business friendly.nu00a0 Wake Up People, This Tolerance is Not Going To Benefit Us!

  28. Jennifer Carole says:

    I was downtown Friday between 5-6pm and it was the first time I was scared to be downtown alone. There were few people out – I guessed working people had already left and evening people hadn’t yet arrived – and the streets were crawling with transients and people who were clearly mentally ill. I could barely move from one store to another without being solicited. One man parked his bike plus trailer in the middle of the street in front of Chefworks – blocking all traffic – so he could fill up his water bottles (about seven of them) at the public water fountain. I don’t want to deny that man water, but he created a hazard and was in no hurry to move things along.u00a0nnI left feeling freaked out and thinking, the Downtown Association has a huge problem. I want to spend my money in those businesses. I believe in our town. I lived in San Francisco for years, I have a high tolerance and yet, dammit, I finally got scared.u00a0nnI want our town back. I want my daughter to be able to hang out downtown after school. I want to shop there and eat there and watch movies on a Friday night.u00a0nnBut first, I want to feel safe.

  29. Forbes says:

    Thank you for taking the risk andu00a0often lonely position of talking truth!nIt is important to bring truth out of the shadows for our own awareness.nn2010 FBI stats put violent crime per 1000 people in Santa Cruz at 9.6 – only surpaassed in the Bay Area by Oakland at 15.3, Emeryville at 12.5, and Richmond at 11.3.nIn 2005, for California cities with populations between 50-60k, Santa Cruz was the worst with over 500 violent crimes. nnFor more info checknhttp://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/datacenter/fbi-stats-crime-in-the-bay-area-in-2010.htmlnYou’ll have to search Santa Cruz in bottom left search box.nnSanta Cruz has such an embellished reputation that its easy to overlook the problems. nNow the problems are getting louder and we have no choice but to address them. To address them, and be real about them, does not mean that we are against Santa Cruz, does not mean that our hearts do not bleed for the officers who lost their lives. Quite the contrary, it means we want to feel safe here and for our children to feel safe.nu00a0

  30. RazerRay says:

    “One man parked his bike plus trailer in the middle of the street in front of Chefworks – blocking all traffic – so he could fill up his water bottles (about seven of them) at the public water fountain.”nnOH… MY… GOD!n(snigger)nnI was downtown about the same time Jennifer.. Actually I’mu00a0downtownu00a0A LOT as a societal observing journalist… Perhaps I was one of the people you were ‘scared’ ofu00a0becauseu00a0I’m a middle age male who has long hair, u00a0rides a bike and hangs out wherever I feel like.u00a0Wheneveru00a0I feel like. I know junkies AND millionaires around here and I LIKE IT that way.nnIt’s called “Free Association”. You ought to try it sometimes when your meds kick in and the edge is taken off your fear of being in publicnnIn my estimation the last couple of days downtown were very veryu00a0quiet.nnI was notu00a0harassedu00a0for leaning on walls, and theu00a0Sheriffsu00a0could give a flying if I was smoking on Pacific. I saw no ranters or violence of ANY kind. including no men catcalling women and other culturally common forms of harassment… unlike on days most of u00a0the SCPD is swarming around the three block shopping area call Downtown.nnToday one of my female friends came up with her two young children from rural Monterey county. We hadu00a0coffeeu00a0at the local Starbucks and she ran into quite a few friends she had’t seen for a while.nnI wonder if you were at the same Downtown Santa Cruz… Or IF you were really there at all, or MAYBE you’re simply scared of anyone not just… like… you.nnI’m from New York originally and been in Santa Cruz for four decades now… I consider SF to be a skanky alcoholic-of-all-age filled slum of a citynnMaybe you should move back to San Francisco if you felt more comfortable there.u00a0nWe will not miss you OR your idea of what constitutes a safe city. Which seems to mean that people shouldn’t fill their water bottles in public from a public fountain

  31. RazerRay says:

    So what do you think about middle class housed people who kill cops?

  32. Connor W says:

    Has all that medical cannabis affected your reading comprehension?u00a0My point was they are not hippies any more, they gave up “fighting the man” a long time ago, and deal with their guilt by voting for a proxy like Don Lane or Mike Rotkin,u00a0who are more interested in social justice than actually operating a city.u00a0nnNot blaming hippies, blaming baby boomers.

  33. erked says:

    What do you mean by that. Middle Class???Housed???

  34. James Burtnett says:

    Sorry Connor W don’t smoke it, but I am a BABY BOOMER HIPPIE all Hippies were Baby Boomers What have you beenu00a0ingesting?u00a0

  35. James Burtnett says:

    Like I said POOR DOGS!

  36. Anonymous says:

    Oh my guess is that looking for a job is not exactly at the top of the priority list for most of these folks. Not even remotely.

  37. RazerRay says:

    The guy who killed the two officers.u00a0Middle Class Housed… Employed till quite recently, Marineu00a0Veteran,u00a0Cop killer.u00a0u00a0nnThe “editor” (quotes intentional) u00a0here threw troll bait to the Take Back Santa Cruz fear-filled Fascist brigade by making the deaths of the officers (both of whom I knew well) u00a0a homeless druggie issue but neither drugs nor homelessness had anything to do with the officer’s deaths.nnNow you might actually want to read up on it in the news section because, like others here, you can’t grasp the connection between his writings and the event that led to it by reading the editor’s drivel about what is essentially a socioeconomic problem the city created by displacing their workers to make room for UC students and transient office workers… for the benefit of the property and businessu00a0interestsu00a0… at the expense of anything resembling a functional community.nnThe Senile has been whining about it and displacing the blame onto theu00a0victimsu00a0of those city policies foru00a0at leastu00a0the last 40 years .nnFurther Iu00a0wantu00a0to know why the moderator isn’t canning every homeless hate baiting comment here as off-topic seeing that the deaths of theu00a0officersu00a0has nothing to do with the editor’s conjecture… Except that IS the ONLY conjecture ANYONE at the Senile will ever propose no matter how crude and faulty.Because race baiting (Chicanos and the small black community), the other thing the Senile does so well, won’t fly here.

  38. Sirf Muse says:

    nnnnnnnnYes. Lets get honest. We don’t know why Jeremy Goulet, the man described by his family as a “ticking time bomb”, finally exploded in Santa Cruz. There were over a dozen mass shootings in 2012 in cities other than Santa Cruz. None of those places had a self-proclaimed policy to “keep weird” and their normalcy did not protect them u00a0from those murderers. Theu00a0argumentu00a0that our attitude ofu00a0acceptance ofu00a0alternative lifestyles is causing people like Mr. Goulet to come to Santa Cruz is illogical and sounds desperate.u00a0nnThis is not to say we don’t have any problems here, just that our attitude of “tolerance” doesn’t make us that much different than all those other communities where tragedy has struck. Nearly everyone in this country is having to deal with the same economy, same difficulties in finding meaningful work. Most of us are or have friends and family members struggling with getting decent healthcare, housing etc. Hopefully we will come up with some ideas on addressing these real underlying problem and address that instead of creating an atmosphere of hatred and intolerance in hopes that we will somehow scare all the boogie men away.u00a0nnMore likely, the surge in violence nationwide has more to deal with an increase in untreated mental illness which is being exasperated by years of deteriorating funding andu00a0multipleu00a0sources of stress. We have increasing numbers of people who are not coping. Violence is the result .u00a0

  39. Sirf Muse says:

    nnnnnnnnYes. Lets get honest. We don’t know why Jeremy Goulet, the man described by his family as a “ticking time bomb”, finally exploded in Santa Cruz. There were over a dozen mass shootings in 2012 in cities other than Santa Cruz. None of those places had a self-proclaimed policy to “keep weird” and their normalcy did not protect them u00a0from those murderers. Theu00a0argumentu00a0that our attitude ofu00a0acceptance ofu00a0alternative lifestyles is causing people like Mr. Goulet to come to Santa Cruz is illogical and sounds desperate.u00a0nnThis is not to say we don’t have any problems here, just that our attitude of “tolerance” doesn’t make us that much different than all those other communities where tragedy has struck. Nearly everyone in this country is having to deal with the same economy, same difficulties in finding meaningful work. Most of us are or have friends and family members struggling with getting decent healthcare, housing etc. Hopefully we will come up with some ideas on addressing these real underlying problem and address that instead of creating an atmosphere of hatred and intolerance in hopes that we will somehow scare all the boogie men away.u00a0nnMore likely, the surge in violence nationwide has more to deal with an increase in untreated mental illness which is being exasperated by years of deteriorating funding andu00a0multipleu00a0sources of stress. We have increasing numbers of people who are not coping. Violence is the result .u00a0

  40. Andrea Kacmarski says:

    I remmber the manager at a high end market who raped one woman and murdered a pregnant woman who had worked at the same market. We always look to the brain as being the only culprit and ignore what the individual ate or if that individual excerized on and on. It is the endocrinological system that can effect how the brain functions. There’s a good book called “Idiot’s Guide to Thyroid Desease” by a Dr. Alan Christianson(sic)u00a0( Please excuse me for being lazy and not looking up misspelled words) The brain is part of the body and the how the body functions, but we continue to over analyze the brain and blame how the person reacts to that person’s enviorment on that person. For example, Adolf Hitler, according to a National Geological program, had au00a0gold bridge in his mouth. Now if that gold wasn’t prepared right, it would have mercury in it. The mercury affects the brain thru the functioning of the thyroid, after awhile, when it builds up to a point the thyroid will go into hypothyroid and shut down. (by the way, thereu00a0are quick silver mines over in Almaden/Twin Creeks area near San Jose, signs everywhere alert visitors not to fish in the creeks because of mercury contamination) Mercury is similiar in molacular structure as iodine, the thyroid uptakes iodine to convert into T cells, there is T1’s, T2’s, T3’s, and T4’s. T3’s go immediatly to your body’s cells. T4’s are like storage cells, the adrenal gland produces a hormone called cortisol that strips one molucule of iodine from the T4, converting it into a T3. It hasn’t been found out what T1’s do, but T2’s may have something to do with how body fat is processed? As a kid in the California Conservation Corps, I remmber someone telling a group of us that gold miners would go crazy because of mercury poisoning.u00a0 Mercury can be found in our food and vaccines. I just don’t think all the knowledge is out there for most people in medicineu00a0to properlyu00a0diagnose what really ails people. Lastly,u00a0 why do older men need viagra if it’s all in the head?

  41. 40yearshere says:

    Naive, childish, self-referential, bubble-livingu00a0 Santa Cruz.u00a0 Ground Zero for divisive, UCSC-inspired, Feminist Insanity and the War On Men.u00a0u00a0 So many people attaching themselves to controversial causes purely for the sake of self-promotion and money. nnu00a0THESE LATEST THREE DEATHS WOULD NOT HAVE OCCURRED but for the ever-increasing, draconian laws against natural (but not necessarily good) male behavior.u00a0u00a0 Clearly, this trend will continue, as we mindlessly reward self-proclaimed “law and order” politicians who have no particular qualifications (at all levels of government).u00a0 nnThank you, SCCPVAW, WAWC, DDM, SHC, Greensite, UCSC, and all the others.u00a0 Thank you so much.u00a0 But, at least you are paying your mortgage via these social plays.u00a0u00a0 All the race and gender-based nonprofits are fomenting hatred and dividing the nation.u00a0 If this were the 1950s, you’d all be on trial for being communists.u00a0 Perhaps now you’re collaborating with China ?u00a0 (Note: I voted for Obama both times – and I support abortion and gay rights – don’t label me an old right winger).nnBefore flaming this, you need to spend many years traveling around the world to see how other cultures view and handle these issues.u00a0 Their attitudes are very different than ours.u00a0 HINTS:u00a0 It’s not because they are “less leading edge” than we are.u00a0 It’s not because they don’t want “social justice”.u00a0u00a0 Many around the world think the US has gone totally nuts at this point.nnIt has to be said.nnPeace Out.

  42. Uc-employee says:

    u00a0Interesting and painfully true.u00a0 And what about the recent false rape report at UCSC ?u00a0 Will there be charges ? What was her motive ? Was Gillian involved ?nn

  43. SaveSantaCruz says:

    I am sad for the fallen officers.u00a0 It was a horrible eye opening incident of what is really going on in Santa Cruz.u00a0 When I moved to Santa Cruz a few years ago, I was warned that Santa Cruz is a town of drugs, low aspiring poverty line surfers, and homeless drifters.u00a0 I thought no.u00a0 This canu2019t be.u00a0 Itu2019s beautiful and there are pockets of cute up-kept neighborhoods and families.u00a0 Now I realize that when you visit Santa Cruz on the weekends, you are mingling with folks from the valley here on a visit to their beach cottage and whatnot.u00a0 Monday morning rolls around and itu2019s frightening what you see or just donu2019t see on the weekends.u00a0 Just in the last 30 days, there were 214 crimes committed in this small town (http://crimereports.org/).u00a0 I have a school age child and Iu2019m not kidding.u00a0 The families I have met through school are are on welfare, used to be on drugs, dads in jail, absent dads growing pot up north, etc.u00a0 The few hard working parents commute over the hill.u00a0 56% of kids in the school qualify for the free state lunch program.u00a0 That seems like a lot.u00a0 I really wonder what is going on with the local community.u00a0 Just the other day, I drove to work and counted roughly 37 homeless people.u00a0 37 in a maybe 8 minute drive!u00a0 But, beyond the homeless problem.u00a0 There is a drug problem.u00a0 There is a lack of employment.u00a0 Maybe a lack of work ethic.u00a0 I donu2019t know.u00a0 It seems people here are more involved in saving the environment than saving the people who live in it.u00a0 Lu00a0 I wish I had a solution.u00a0 Just food for thought.

  44. Anonymous says:

    A new narrative… An intriguing thought! u00a0It’s a compelling moment for a turning of the page. u00a0Our little town has an influence far beyond it’s size. u00a0″Santa Cruz” is known around the world not primarily for drugs, homelessness, or crime. u00a0It’s known as the mecca for many of the finest skaters, surfers, mountain bikers, and rock climbers the world has ever seen. u00a0Perhaps there are the seeds of future genius and talent among us even now. u00a0Perhaps we will invent and export other culturally revolutionary ideas and activities. u00a0Embracing firmer boundaries and higher cultural expectations creates an environment where creativity and genius can flourish. u00a0″Weird” does not have to mean “wasted.” u00a0Perhaps in a new narrative, “weird” can return to it’s root meaning… “Destined.”

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